The Deviant Gentleman

The Deviant Gentleman

Exterminate All Rational Thought

one time my brother wrote an egg horror poem

venusmilk:

Luigi RossiBimba seduta, di profilo, 1915-1918

venusmilk:

Luigi Rossi
Bimba seduta, di profilo, 1915-1918

art-of-swords:

Studies on the Ulfberht Swords
Since I got a couple of messages asking about these swords, with help from James G. Elmslie (thank you!), have some academic reading about them. Before you start glorifying, please read…
Studies Of Viking Age Swords: Metallography and Archaeology
by Eva Elisabeth Astrup & Irmelin Martens
The paper is a comment on Alan Williams’ investigation “A Metallurgical Study of some Viking Swords” published in Gladius XXIX. Williams’ paper comprises metallurgical inventigations of 44 Viking Age swords, all with the ‘ULFBERHT’ inscriptions. Such investigations, made by a well qualified metallurgist are essential to archaeology.
Unfortunately, this one has some serious limitations. In order to give a good descriptions of the quality of the swords-blade, samples showing at least the section through both the edge and the central part of the blade are necessary.
This is mostly not the case in Williams’ investigations, and he gives insufficient information about his samples. Other weak points are his group division and his interpretation of the production area for the blades containing high-carbon steel.
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

The Ulfberht sword blades reevaluated 
by Anne Stalsberg 
Readers of archaeological literature about Viking Age weapons are familiar with the male name ‘Vlfberht’ which is welded onto Viking Age sword blades. The name is in the archaeological litetrature also written ‘Ulfberh’; V and U were used interchanganly for the semi-vowel [ w ], but the sword blade signature is with one wingle expection “written” <V>. 
‘Ulfberh’ is regarded as a Frankish blacksmith and the name itself is Frankish, from the lower Rhine Area, and it is generally supposed that his sword blades were traded from the Frankish Realm to pagan Europe. During preparations for the publication of the Norwegian-Russian Sword Project it struck me that these “axioms” need a renewed discussion.
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © Gladius | Jenny Rita Blog

art-of-swords:

Studies on the Ulfberht Swords

Since I got a couple of messages asking about these swords, with help from James G. Elmslie (thank you!), have some academic reading about them. Before you start glorifying, please read…

Studies Of Viking Age Swords: Metallography and Archaeology

  • by Eva Elisabeth Astrup & Irmelin Martens

The paper is a comment on Alan Williams’ investigation “A Metallurgical Study of some Viking Swords” published in Gladius XXIX. Williams’ paper comprises metallurgical inventigations of 44 Viking Age swords, all with the ‘ULFBERHT’ inscriptions. Such investigations, made by a well qualified metallurgist are essential to archaeology.

Unfortunately, this one has some serious limitations. In order to give a good descriptions of the quality of the swords-blade, samples showing at least the section through both the edge and the central part of the blade are necessary.

This is mostly not the case in Williams’ investigations, and he gives insufficient information about his samples. Other weak points are his group division and his interpretation of the production area for the blades containing high-carbon steel.

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

The Ulfberht sword blades reevaluated 

  • by Anne Stalsberg 

Readers of archaeological literature about Viking Age weapons are familiar with the male name ‘Vlfberht’ which is welded onto Viking Age sword blades. The name is in the archaeological litetrature also written ‘Ulfberh’; V and U were used interchanganly for the semi-vowel [ w ], but the sword blade signature is with one wingle expection “written” <V>. 

Ulfberh’ is regarded as a Frankish blacksmith and the name itself is Frankish, from the lower Rhine Area, and it is generally supposed that his sword blades were traded from the Frankish Realm to pagan Europe. During preparations for the publication of the Norwegian-Russian Sword Project it struck me that these “axioms” need a renewed discussion.

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © Gladius | Jenny Rita Blog

(via naturemetaltolkien)

demoniality:

magictransistor:

Athanasius Kircher. Ars Magna Lucis et Umbrae (The Great Art of Light and Shadow). 1646.

While I have no tattoos and do not plan on having any, I would just like to say that the reverse/right-side-up devil in the second photo would make a great tattoo.  Or a silly one.

(via nonesistelunasullaterra)

Anonymous said: あなたの触手を私に触れる

o0o0o0o0o0o0o0o0o0o0:

Many men talk like philosophers and live like fools.

Philip K. Dick (via strangeturnip)

(Source: audente, via strangeturnip)

(Source: notgrey, via strangeturnip)

strangeturnip:

thedeviantgentleman cuddle me and tell me i am the best birbie better than all the other bwirds then feeda me & give me money

dum birb im going to destroy ur nest so you have to live on my shoulder